For more information you
can visit
www.fda.gov

 Face Forward Facial Studio

    "A Beauty Spa"
    2038 43rd Ave West
    Bradenton,  Florida
34205
 941 704 2238


missgini@faceforwardfacialstudio.com
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Miss Gini

SPF ?'s

"I wanted to keep my clients aware of the newest rulings concerning SPF.  I went directly to the FDA website to bring you the following information, which was updated 06.2.011:"

Q1. Why is FDA making changes to how sunscreens are marketed in the United States? 

A. FDA is making changes to how sunscreens are marketed in the United States as part of the Agency's ongoing efforts to ensure that sunscreens meet modern-day standards for safety and effectiveness and to help consumers have the information they need so they can choose the right sun protection for themselves and their families. Prior rules on sunscreens dealt almost exclusively with protection against sunburn, which is primarily caused by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from the sun, and did not address ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation, which contributes to skin cancer and early skin aging. After reviewing the latest science, FDA determined that sufficient data are available to establish a "broad spectrum" test for determining a sunscreen product's UVA protection. Passing the broad spectrum test shows that the product provides UVA protection that is proportional to its UVB protection.

Sunscreen products that pass the broad spectrum test are allowed to be labeled as "Broad Spectrum." These "Broad Spectrum" sunscreens protect against both UVA and UVB rays. Scientific data demonstrated that products that are "Broad Spectrum SPF 15 [or higher]" have been shown to reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging when used with other sun protection measures, in addition to helping prevent sunburn. Other sun protection measures include limiting time in the sun and wearing protective clothing.

These testing and labeling requirements are necessary to provide consumers with the information they need to make informed choices when selecting sunscreens.
 

Q2. When will these changes take effect?  

A. The Final Rule will take effect by the summer of 2012, but consumers may begin to see changes to sunscreen labels before the effective date.
 

Q3. What does the SPF value on sunscreen labels indicate? 

A. The SPF value indicates the level of sunburn protection provided by the sunscreen product. All sunscreens must be tested according to an SPF test procedure. The test measures the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure it takes to cause sunburn when a person is using a sunscreen in comparison to how much UV exposure it takes to cause a sunburn when they do not use a sunscreen. The product is then labeled with the appropriate SPF value indicating the amount of sunburn protection provided by the product. Higher SPF values (up to 50) provide greater sunburn protection. Because SPF values are determined from a test that measures protection against sunburn caused by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, SPF values only indicate a sunscreen's UVB protection.

However, sunscreens that pass the new broad spectrum test will have demonstrated that they also provide ultraviolet A (UVA) protection that is proportional to their UVB protection. To pass the broad spectrum test, sunscreens with higher SPF values will provide higher levels of UVA protection as well. Therefore, under the new label requirements, a higher SPF value for sunscreens labeled "Broad Spectrum SPF [value]" will indicate a higher level of protection from both UVA and UVB radiation.
 

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